Tag Archives: Eco Lodge

Eco Rustic | Rimba Orang Utan Eco Lodge, Sekonyer River, Kumai, Central Borneo

By Dian Hasan | July 21, 2010


The “Klotok” traditional wooden boat that meanders through the calm river with nothing but the lush rainforest jungle accompanied by the soundtrack of nature.

Arguably, Indonesia’s tourism industry might not be as well developed as some of her Southeast Asian neighbors, and that is of course not due to a lack of attractions. After all, Indonesia is home to Bali, her crown jewel tourism magnet. Indonesia’s entire modern tourism industry seemingly is centered on Bali, leaving other areas relatively undeveloped.

In the past, such condition may have been considered to be behind the times, but in the advent of raised awareness regarding sustainability and eco-consciousness, this is Indonesia’s blessing. For this vast archipelago, with the world’s second richest rainforest biodiversity after the Amazonis most probably the world’s last eden! An endangered eden that is fast disappearing. And it’s up to us all to strive for a sustainable development that champions economic progress without compromising natural resources for future generations.

It is outside Bali, in the unexplored corners of Sumatra, Borneo and Eastern Indonesia, where Indonesia’s greatest gift to mankind is being conserved – her fauna and flora. The Komodo “dragon” monitor lizardOrangutanJava RhinoSumatran ElephantRhino and Tiger are just some of the more famous residents – whose habitat can only be found in Indonesia. The fate and survival of these endangered species depend on the global community coming together with the right initiatives.

Rimba Lodge’s main bungalow where Julia Roberts stayed while filming the 1993 PBS Documentary: “In the Wild: Orangutans with Julia Roberts”


Rimba Lodge, the perfect gathering place, where man and primate interact.

Ecotourism is one way, in which these efforts are executed, raising awareness of the animals’ plight, and helping generate much-needed revenue to help with conservation efforts, while practicing responsible tourism.

Eco Lodges Indonesia (ELI) is a pioneering, ecotourism provider operating in an emerging economy, with a focus on biodiversity conservation and enhancement of local community livelihoods. Eco Lodges Indonesia runs four ecolodges in Indonesia’s major National Parks, and partakes in the protection of these endangered animals. The other objective is to improve the livelihoods of local communities where the properties are located.

Eco Lodges Indonesia is one of the first to pursue international sustainable tourism certification in Indonesia, and is committed to achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals through their ecotourism investments and operations.

Rimba Orang Utan Eco Lodge, Tanjung Puting National Park, Central Kalimantan

Rimba Orangutan Eco Lodge is located adjacent to Tanjung Puting National Park and on the edge of the Sekonyer river in Kalimantan (Borneo).

The Lodge is only accessible by boat from the port of Kumai. Arriving at the Lodge jetty in the middle of the forest is an unforgettable experience, likened to expeditions deep in Africa or Brazilian Amazon. The jetty connects to all rooms, the reception area, office and restaurant by a series of covered boardwalks.

The Lodge provides a base from which you can explore the surrounding rainforest and Tanjung Puting National Park. Take a walk from your room along the bird walk, hear the plaintive cry of Gibbons, early birdsong and the resident Macaque monkey troop from your comfortable room, set right on the edge of the gently flowing Sekonyer river.

From the Lodge you travel by klotok (wooden boats)  upstream, surrounded by rainforest, to a number of feeding stations in the Tanjung Puting National Park, the most famous of which is Camp Leakey, established in 1971 by Dr. Biruté Mary Galdikas (founder of Orangutan Foundation International), a student of Professor Louis Leakey, together with Jane Goodall and Diane Fossey. Dr Gladikas is considered as the world’s leading authority on the study of Orangutans.

As you walk through the rainforest you often see orangutans and at Camp Leakey you sometimes see gibbons as well as many butterflies and birds. At the feeding stations you’ll be able to see these amazing primates up close. There are also opportunities to take a night safari to see tarsiers, glowing mushrooms, fireflies and perhaps owls. Other wildlife to be seen in the area are 9 other primate species, crocodiles, butterflies and rare birds such as Storms stork.

The lodge has 35 rooms: 15 Emerald, 6 Sapphire and 14 Ruby. All rooms have mosquito drapes and repellent, fans, double or twin beds, western shower and toilets. Emerald rooms have air conditioning and hot water.


Leeping Proboscis monkeys greet visitors enroute to Rimba Lodge. Locals call them “Monyet Belanda (Dutchman Monkey” for its long nose. Continue reading

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Eco Rustic | Bajo Komodo Eco Lodge, Komodo Island, East Indonesia

By Dian Hasan | July 15, 2010


Komodo, the world’s largest monitor lizard, can grow up to 3m long. One dragon can bring down a buffalo with a single, poisonous bite.  They can run up to 18 km an hour, and have anything for dinner (incl. humans! Tourists beware! There have been missing tourists in the past).

Arguably, Indonesia’s tourism industry might not be as well developed as some of her Southeast Asian neighbors, and that is of course not due to a lack of attractions. After all, Indonesia is home to Bali, her crown jewel tourism magnet. Indonesia’s entire modern tourism industry seemingly is centered on Bali, leaving other areas relatively undeveloped.

In the past, such condition may have been considered to be behind the times, but in the advent of raised awareness regarding sustainability and eco-consciousness, this is Indonesia’s blessing. For this vast archipelago, with the world’s second richest rainforest biodiversity after the Amazonis most probably the world’s last eden! An endangered eden that is fast disappearing. And it’s up to us all to strive for a sustainable development that champions economic progress without compromising natural resources for future generations.

It is outside Bali, in the unexplored corners of Sumatra, Borneo and Eastern Indonesia, where Indonesia’s greatest gift to mankind is being conserved – her fauna and flora. The Komodo “dragon” monitor lizardOrangutanJava RhinoSumatran Elephant, Rhino and Tiger are just some of the more famous residents – whose habitat can only be found in Indonesia. The fate and survival of these endangered species depend on the global community coming together with the right initiatives.

And while Indonesia is not immune from a tug-o-war between economic growth and conservation and sustainable efforts, it is a balancing act that Indonesia is starting to take seriously, with the help of various international organizations.

Ecotourism is one way, in which these efforts are executed, raising awareness of the animals’ plight, and helping generate much-needed revenue to help with conservation efforts, while practicing responsible tourism.

Eco Lodges Indonesia (ELI) is a pioneering, ecotourism provider operating in an emerging economy, with a focus on biodiversity conservation and enhancement of local community livelihoods. Eco Lodges Indonesia runs four ecolodges in Indonesia’s major National Parks, and partakes in the protection of these endangered animals. The other objective is to improve the livelihoods of local communities where the properties are located.

Eco Lodges Indonesia is one of the first to pursue international sustainable tourism certification in Indonesia, and is committed to achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals through their ecotourism investments and operations.

Bajo Komodo Eco Lodge, Komodo National Park, Komodo Island, East Indonesia

Bajo Komodo Eco Lodge is situated near Labuan Bajo on Flores Island. It is the only hotel of its type close to the Komodo National Park, a World Heritage Site.

Alternative accommodation is available in simple wooden beach bungalows on Seraya Island and Kanawa Island,  just off of Komodo Island. Both of them are charming, offering a back-to-nature getaway, although food options at the latter is rather limited.

Bajo Komodo Eco Lodge combines good accommodation, service and cuisine with the ideal opportunity to view the Komodo Dragon giant monitor lizard, and dive, snorkel or view birds in one of the most beautiful coral and island areas on the globe. The Lodge has mosquito proof rooms with AC, en-suite bathrooms with hot water, IDD phone and a desk with chairs.

It also has a swimming pool, bar and restaurant here you can view magnificent sunsets. The staff are all local people giving it a special atmosphere. Room rates include airport or port transfers, breakfast and daily laundry. We also have a vehicle hire service for local or Trans Flores safaris.

The lodge features the island’s best amenities, including: 8 rooms with AC, fan, hot water and phone, complimentary breakfast, swimming pool, free airport transfers, free daily laundry, a restaurant serving three meals per day at reasonable prices, a bar, bottled drinking water supplied.

Also includes information, books and binoculars for bird and butterfly watching, affordable vehicle hire with modern vehicles and experienced drivers, masks/snorkels for hire (no fins), storage area for diving gear, tour information to Komodo National Park, boat pick-up from the beach for snorkelling, diving or river safari.

Eco Lodge Indonesia operates all their properties in accordance to the “six pillars of eco tourism” as suggested by The University of Western Sydney:

1. Depends on the natural environment
2. Ecologically sustainable
3. Proven to contribute to conservation
4. Features an environmental training program
5. Incorporates cultural considerations
6. Provides a net economic return to the local community. Continue reading

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Eco Rustic | Satwa Elephant Lodge, Way Kambas National Park, Lampung, Indonesia

By Dian Hasan | July 15, 2010


The majestic Sumatran elephants and their Mahouts in Way Kambas National Park, Lampung. Not as common a sight as their cousins in Thailand, but Indonesia is the last bastion of elephants in South East Asia (2000: estimated that only 2,000 – 2,700 wild elephants remain)

Arguably, Indonesia’s tourism industry might not be as well developed as some of her Southeast Asian neighbors, and that is of course not due to a lack of attractions. After all, Indonesia is home to Bali, her crown jewel tourism magnet. Indonesia’s entire modern tourism industry seemingly is centered on Bali, leaving other areas relatively undeveloped.

In the past, such condition may have been considered to be behind the times, but in the advent of raised awareness regarding sustainability and eco-consciousness, this is Indonesia’s blessing. For this vast archipelago, with the world’s second richest rainforest biodiversity after the Amazonis most probably the world’s last eden! An endangered eden that is fast disappearing. And it’s up to us all to strive for a sustainable development that champions economic progress without compromising natural resources for future generations.

It is outside Bali, in the unexplored corners of Sumatra, Borneo and Eastern Indonesia, where Indonesia’s greatest gift to mankind is being conserved – her fauna and flora. The Komodo “dragon” monitor lizardOrangutanJava RhinoSumatran Elephant, Rhino and Tiger are just some of the more famous residents – whose habitat can only be found in Indonesia. The fate and survival of these endangered species depend on the global community coming together with the right initiatives.

And while Indonesia is not immune from a tug-o-war between economic growth and conservation and sustainable efforts, it is a balancing act that Indonesia is starting to take seriously, with the help of various international organizations.

Ecotourism is one way, in which these efforts are executed, raising awareness of the animals’ plight, and helping generate much-needed revenue to help with conservation efforts, while practicing responsible tourism.

Eco Lodges Indonesia (ELI) is a pioneering, ecotourism provider operating in an emerging economy, with a focus on biodiversity conservation and enhancement of local community livelihoods. Eco Lodges Indonesia runs four  ecolodges in Indonesia’s major National Parks, and partakes in the protection of these endangered animals.  The other objective is to improve the livelihoods of local communities where the properties are located.

Eco Lodges Indonesia is one of the first to pursue international sustainable tourism certification in Indonesia, and is committed to achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals through their ecotourism investments and operations.

Satwa Elephant Ecolodge, Way Kambas National Park, Lampung, Sumatra.

Satwa Elephant Eco Lodge is only a short walk of 500 meters from Way Kambas Park entrance, adjoining a pleasant rural village. Employment and locally purchased goods by the Eco Lodge significantly help the village and give the local people the opportunity to improve numerous skills for alternative employment.

Way Kambas National Park covers an area of 130,000 hectares, comprising swamp forest and lowland rain forest, it was designated a reserve in 1972. It has long been known for being home to a significant population of Sumatran elephants, some Sumatran tigers and Malaysian tapirs, and numerous bird species. In the 1990s, it was revealed that the park was also home to a little-known or seen population of around 40 Sumatran rhinos – one of only three surviving populations in Indonesia.

Set in an extensive walled garden full of tropical fruit trees are four cottages each with spacious rooms sleeping up to four people with spring beds, ceiling fans, hot water showers and western toilets. There is a desk and computer power point and a verandah and comfortable chairs. All guest cottages, facilities, some perimeter lighting and office are powered by renewable solar energy. The windows are fully screened. In a delightful open restaurant, meals give a taste of Indonesian recipes and ingredients, with a full western breakfast to start the day, or a picnic box.

Satwa Elephant Eco Lodge and all other ELI properties are run in accordance to the “six pillars of eco tourism” as suggested by The University of Western Sydney:

1. Depends on the natural environment
2. Ecologically sustainable
3. Proven to contribute to conservation
4. Features an environmental training program
5. Incorporates cultural considerations
6. Provides a net economic return to the local community. Continue reading

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Green & Chic | Blancaneaux Lodge, Belize, Central America

By Dian Hasan | July 8, 2010

In a natural reserve of Central America, Francis Ford Coppola has created a place that exude more magic than all his Hollywood cinematographic creations. Surrounded by almost 500 square kilometers of pristine jungle, the Blancaneaux Lodge preserves water and energy and uses natural materials for its cabanas.

Francis Ford Coppola is of course internationally known for his movies and particularly for Apocalypse Now, covered with awards. It is by the way because of (or thanks to) this movie that he became an hotelier. He created Blancaneaux Lodge in the jungle of Belize as he was trying to create a paradise in the jungle that resembled the hotel in which his crew stayed in during the shooting of Apocalypse Now in the Philippines.

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Eco Rustic | Seraya Island Huts, Off Komodo Island, East Indonesia

By Dian Hasan | July 6, 2010

When an area’s primary inhabitant is the world’s largest monitor lizard that is touted as the dinosaur’s last descendent, you know that this must be a very unique destination indeed. Rugged and remote, to say the least, with untouched natural beauty that belies its picture postcard image. For intrepid adventure travelers who are game for a true Robinson Crusoe-like experience, this setting can be enjoyed even further with a stay in traditional thatch-roof huts that sit on the beachfront.

Welcome to your own paradise isle: Seraya Island, just off of the famed Komodo Island, east of Bali, Indonesia. A true escape from the ordinary!

Seraya Island - Pano
Seraya Island – aerial view from the hill overlooking the peninsula.

Seraya Island is located off West Flores, 11km from the small port of Labuanbajo, and takes approximately one  hour to reach by boat. Accommodation and transport to the island can be booked through the Gardena Hotel in Labuanbajo.

The collection of just 10 huts built on the beachfront with unrestricted views of the sea… and your neighbors, though everyone tends to keep to themselves. Each hut has a bed wrapped with mosquito netting, a cupboard to store any belongings and an attached bathroom. Since water is only available when the generator is turned on in the evening, you’ll have to make do with using a bucket (and a quick trip to the sea!) to flush the loo. There’s only one restaurant on the island, managed by a small family who also take care of the island. You’ll need to order your dinner earlier on in the day and for certain items, at least one day in advance. It couldn’t get any more adventurous than that!

Seraya Island - Huts
Seraya Island – Huts

Seraya Island - Beachfront
Seraya Island – Beachfront

The entire island can be explored just under two hours. For the best views, simply trek uphill to the small peak behind the huts for a stunning view of the entire island. And a favorite spot to watch sunsets.

Seraya Island - Sunset
A landscape that is more akin to Greece’s, with manicured tall grass billowing in the wind.

The crystal, clear water and shallow reef stretching 60m around Seraya is ideal for snorkeling. At any given time, you’re guaranteed to see some starfish, silver dollars or even sea snakes! Don’t worry if you’ve forgotten your gear, you can rent out fins, mask and snorkel directly from the restaurant. Continue reading

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Eco Rustic | Kanawa Island Beach Bungalows, Off Komodo Island, East Indonesia

By Dian Hasan | July 1, 2010

As a travel destination, Indonesia has long held captive the imaginations of many. Arresting sights for the world’s the culture- and nature- curious travelers. Stunning natural environment, intriguing culture, and beguiling flora and fauna to match.

The Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is one such curiosity. The world’s largest monitor lizard, it can reach up to 65 kilograms (365 pounds) in weight and 3,13 meters in length. Female Komodo Dragons rarely grow over 2,5 meters (7 feet 6 inches) in length. Komodos may appear sedentary most of the time, but they can run! They commonly run at a slow trot of 8-10 km/hour, but when startled, they can pace up to 18 km/hour for short distances. Scientists estimate that Komodos can live up to 50 years or longer.

Komodos live exclusively on Komodo Island, in the Komodo National Park. The national park was established in 1980 to protect the Komodo dragon, and the marine biodiversity in the surrounding islands. In 1991 the national park was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Accommodation is available on the island, Bajo Komodo Eco Lodge, a certified eco lodge run by Eco Lodges Indonesia that operates three other eco lodges in national parks in Sumatra, Kalimantan (Borneo), and Bali.

And for those seeking the solitude and tranquility of living like Robinson Crusoe on a deserted tropical isle, there are Seraya Island Bungalows and Kanawa Island Beach Bungalows on the nearby islands.

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Baobab & Wet Volcanoes make a unique Eco-Lodge couple ~ Chile

baobad_interior-2

When Chilean architect Rodrigo Verdugo ventured into the design of two Eco Loges in Chile’s Huilo Huilo Private Natural Reserve, he was set to take his imagination to new heights. While La Montaña Mágica (The Magic Mountain) Hotel was inspired by an erupting volcano, with cascading water replacing the fire and amber, the idea for the second lodge, Baobab Hotel was probably drawn from a bee-hive, or a snail’s shell.

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